Published On: Wed, Mar 14th, 2012

His Favorite Pastime Charlie following a Beautiful Lady

Charlie gets into a fight at his regular bar and finally crawls out under the door. He then boards a streetcar and follows a beautiful lady in a taxi. He breaks into her home. Her husband comes finds him trying to seduce his wife.

This Movie ‘His Favorite Pastime’ Sir Charlie Chaplin as usual follow a beautiful lady till his home.

This movie is a 1914 American comedy film starring Charlie Chaplin. Happend to be 7th movie by Charlie directed by George Nichols for Keystone Studios

Synopsis
His Favorite Pastime by Sir Charlie Chaplin
Charlie gets drunk in the bar. He steps outside, meets a pretty woman, tries to flirt with her, only to retreat after the woman’s father returns. Returning to the bar, Charlie drinks some more and engages in rogue behaviors with others. He finally leaves the bar, sees the woman leaving, follows the woman home, and proceeds to make a nuisance of himself, eventually getting kicked out of the house.

Cast

Charles Chaplin – Drunken masher
Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbuckle – Shabby drunk
Viola Barry – Beautiful lady

Charlie gets into a fight at his regular bar and finally crawls out under the door. He then boards a streetcar and follows a beautiful lady in a taxi. He breaks into her home. Her husband comes finds him trying to seduce his wife.

Watch Online Charlie Chaplin’s  His Favorite Pastime

Movie Reviews :

Charlie Chaplin once again mined his stage inebriate act for his seventh foray into film, His Favorite Pastime. The short begins in a bar, and Chaplin’s tramp character is already so stewed that when lighting his cigar, he tosses away the cigar and hangs onto the lit match. After dealing with another drunk (Fatty Arbuckle) who is intent on stealing Chaplin’s beer, the tramp steps out of the bar to catch some air. There he spies a pretty young woman, and he hits on her hard… until her husband shows up. While returning to the bar seems like a relatively safe move, Chaplin ends up spending more time roughhousing with the other barflies (and an uncooperative swinging door) than he does downing whiskey.

Eventually the tramp returns to the street and catches a glimpse of the married woman getting into an automobile. The lecherous lush follows the car and somehow manages to arrive at the woman’s house before she does herself; but the stewed stalker is forced to hit the streets when the woman, her maid, her husband, and various neighbors make it clear that he is an unwelcome guest.

His Favorite Pastime will never be confused with Chaplin’s best work. Like most of the early Chaplin Keystone shorts, the film has little plot beyond “Chaplin drinks and causes mayhem,” and the comedian’s tramp character lacks the subtlety and depth that would develop once the comic gained full control of his productions. While slapstick roughhousing would always be part of Chaplin’s comic arsenal; in the later films, the recipients of the tramp’s boot would deserve the abuse. In His Favorite Pastime, Chaplin strikes out at innocents and is simply a drunken lout.

Still, it’s easy to see why Chaplin’s character and this particular short were hits with audiences of the time. The comedian manages a number of funny improvisations with props, including his battle with a swinging door that anticipates his mêlée with a Murphy bed in the later short One A.M. (1916). There are also some nice acrobatics, including a tumble over a stair rail into a perfect sitting position on a couch below. While there is little motivation for Chaplin’s actions beyond the fact that he is lubricated in the extreme, the story holds together better than in most of his earlier Keystones, and the short is a major improvement over his previous film, Tango Tangles (1914).

Follow Us



(: Get Free Laughter :)